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Annette Heuser on U.S.-German Relationship

In a July 21 lunch discussion on US-German relations, Annette Heuser, Executive Director of the Bertelsmann Foundation in Washington DC and a top expert in the trans-Atlantic relationshiop, discussed how the discord caused by the recent U.S. espionage scandal in Germany will not resolve itself. 

Read the summary here

Click here to watch the event. 

Obama's Climate and Energy Policy

In a July 11 panel on climate and energy policy speakers  Jeffrey Hopkins, Vice President for Policy and Analysis at the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions, Vaughan Turekian, Chief International Officer at the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and Samuel Thernstrom, Executive Director of the Energy Innovation Reform Project and Senior Fellow at the Center for the National Interest, disagreed about the likely effectiveness of the President 's Action Plan and the Obama Administration's overall energy policy strategy as a way of effectively addressing climate change. 

Read the summary here.

 

The Triangular Relations of Russia, China and the United States

In a July 2 lunch event at the Center, Graham Allison, Director of the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard University, and  Dimitri K. Simes, President of the Center for the National Interest, discussed the United States' bilateral relations with Russia and the potential to push Russia towards a stronger relationship with China. TNI Editor Jacob Heilbrunn moderated.

Tensions in the South China Sea 

In a June 27 discussion at the Center, Abraham Denmark, Vice President of the National Bureau of Asian Research, and Dan Blumenthal, Director of Asian Studies at the American Enterprise Institute, evaluated deterrence and assurance strategies in dealing with expansion in the South China Sea. Harry Kazianis, Managing Editor of The National Interest magazine, moderated.

Read the summary here.

Click here to watch the event.

Ambassador H.E. Cui Tiankai on the U.S. and China

H.E. Cui Tiankai, China's Ambassador to the United States, assessed  relations between the United States and China as well as security in the Asia Pacific region in an off-the-record lunchtime event at the Center on June 20. Center Vice Chairman and former Under Secretary of Defense Dov S. Zakheim moderated.

Robert Kaplan on Instability in the Pacific

Robert Kaplan broke down the geopolitics of China's rise in a June 19 luncheon discussion at the Center. Kaplan, chief geopolitical analyst at Stratfor and correspondent for the Atlantic, also considered the roles of Japan, India, and American foreign policy on stability in Asia. General Charles G. Boyd (USAF, Ret.), the chairman of the Center's board of directors, moderated the event.

Read the summary here.

Click here to watch the event.

Click here to watch an interview with Robert Kaplan.

Europe's Elections and Politics

On June 5, 2014, Hans Stein, Director of International Political Dialogue with European Institutions and North America at the Friedrich Naumann Stiftung Foundation, described the breakdown of the institutions and political parties in the recent European Union elections as well as the "clash of institutions" over the upcoming election for EU Commission President. Jacob Heilbrunn moderated the event.

Read the summary here.

Russia, Europe, China, and Energy

On June 4, at the Center for the National Interest, Edward C. Chow, Senior Fellow in Energy and National Security for Center for Strategic and International Studies, and Andreas Goldthau, Visiting Scholar at Harvard University, shared their perspectives on European energy security after the Ukraine crisis. Paul Saunders, the Center’s Executive Director, moderated the event.

Read the summary here.

Michael Lind on America's Role in the World - the End of the Washington Consensus

Michael Lind, Policy Director of the Economic Growth Program at the New America Foundation, and author of "The Promise of American Nationalism" in the May-June 2014 issue of The National Interest, discussed his view of America's role in the world and called for a return to American nationalism.

The event was broadcast live on C-SPAN2.  

Read the summary here.

National Security, Resource Competition and Climate Change 

The Center for the National Interest held a workshop at Tufts University European Center in Talloires, France, from May 8 to 11, 2014 to discuss "National Security, Resource Competition and Climate Change." Thirteen participants examined topics ranging from rising sea levels to shortage of water in Asia in a successful two days gathering at the Priory. The workshop was organized and chaired by  Geoffrey Kemp, Director of the Regional Security Programs and funded by a grant from Carnegie Corporation. 

Ukraine Crisis and the Future of Relations between America and Russia

During a discussion panel at the Center, Russian experts Thomas Graham, managing director at Kissinger Associates, and Paul Saunders, Executive Director of the Center, assessed the US-Russian confrontation over Ukraine. Center President Dimitri K. Simes moderated.

American International Leadership

 

Debates over state of American global leadership and the shape it should take undergird every major foreign policy discussion in the United States. The Center hosted an event - as a part of a new series for the rising generation of foreign policy leaders - on these issues featuring John Bew of King's College London, Elbridge Colby of the Center for a New American Security, and Joshua Walker of the German Marshall Fund.  Ryan Evans, the Center's assistant director, moderated.

Click here to watch the event

Australian Ambassador Kim Beazley on the Asia Pivot

 

As the center of gravity in the global economy moves increasingly toward the Asia-Pacific region, security-related tensions there have also grown.  As a key U.S. ally in Asia, Australia has both an important perspective and valuable contributions to make in managing these and other changes in Asia.  On April 2, Ambassador Kim Beazley discussed Australia’s views of the evolving Asia-Pacific region and assessed trends and policy responses. 

Click here to watch the event and read a summary of the event here.

John Judis on America and Israel

 

The issue of Israeli-American relations has been fiercely debated in recent years. New Republic senior editor John Judis’ new book, Genesis, has attracted attention for its examination of the Truman administration’s recognition of Israel in 1948. The Center hosted Judis to discuss these issues and more. TNI Editor Jacob Heilbrunn moderated.

Click here to read a summary of the event.

Russia, America, Europe and the Future of Ukraine

 

At this lunchtime event on the political tumult in Ukraine, two experts brought to bear their close personal experiences with the region. Ambassador Paula Dobriansky served as the Under Secretary of State for Democracy and Global Affairs in the George W. Bush Administration and has dealt extensively with Ukraine as a senior official and an analyst.  Andranik Migranyan, Director of the Institute for Democracy and Cooperation, a Russian non-profit organization in New York is an informal advisor to Russia’s Presidential Administration.  He recently returned from Moscow, where he interacted with a number of senior officials.  Richard Burt, a former Ambassador to Germany and former Assistant Secretary of State for European and Canadian Affairs, moderated the event.

Click here to read a summary of the event and here to watch the event on Youtube.

Congressman Randy Forbes on Strategy, Asia, and Military Technology

 

Speaking at the Center for the National Interest, Representative J. Randy Forbes declared, “I don’t want to wake up five years from now and I realize I missed a game-changer” in military technology.  Rep. Forbes also decried the lack of U.S. strategy in East Asia. As Chairman of the House Armed Services Subcommittee on Seapower & Projection Forces, he is a leader on the relationship between strategy and budgetary politics.  His talk at the Center for the National Interest – moderated by Harry Kazianis, Managing Editor of The National Interest – revolved around those topics. Forbes offered a Capitol Hill-centric perspective on defense strategy in the Asia-Pacific region and offered insights on how military figures and foreign policy experts could better communicate with harried policymakers and legislators.

Click here to read a summary of the event and here to watch the event on Youtube.

U.S.-Russia Relations: From Sochi to Kyiv and Beyond

As the Sochi Olympics approached, the Center assembled a prominent panel of experts to take stock of the U.S.-Russia relationship and its prospects on February 3, 2014. Speakers included Thomas Graham, Managing Director at Kissinger Associates and a former Special Assistant to the President and National Security Council Senior Director for Russian Affairs; Bruce Hoffman, Professor and Director of the Center for Security Studies, Georgetown University’s Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, and a former U.S. government counterterrorism advisor; Matthew Rojansky, Director of the Kennan Institute at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, who recently spent an extended period in Ukraine conducting research; and Paul J. Saunders, Executive Director of the Center for the National Interest and a former State Department Senior Advisor. Dimitri Simes, the President and CEO of the Center, moderated the event.

A summary of the event can be read here. You can watch the video on YouTube or at C-SPAN.

John Mearsheimer on American Foreign Policy

“The United States is more secure than it has ever been in its history, yet nevertheless it is running around the globe as if there are threats everywhere,” said Professor John Mearsheimer at the Center for the National Interest.  Jacob Heilbrunn, the Editor of The National Interest, moderated this wide-ranging discussion on American power, foreign policy, and misadventures abroad. Mearsheimer, the R. Wendell Harrison Distinguished Service Professor of Political Science at the University of Chicago, sought to skewer the interventionist foreign policy establishment in Washington for their desire to intervene in the conflicts and politics of nations whose fate, he claimed, did not affect American core interests.  At the same time, Mearsheimer argued that the United States will be forced to act like a great power again and be more disciplined in its strategic decisions if China rises successfully.

Read the summary here and watch the event on YouTube or C-SPAN.

The Center for the National Interest's 20th Anniversary Dinner

On January 14, the Center for the National Interest celebrated the 20th Anniversay of its founding by former President Richard Nixon.  An august audience joined us to commemorate this important landmark.  The speakers included the Center's President and CEO Dimitri K. Simes; Jacob Heilbrunn, the Editor of The National Interest; General Brent Scowcroft, a Member of the Center's Board of Directors; Dr. Henry Kissinger, the Honorary Chairman of the Board of Directors; Mr. Maurice R. "Hank" Greenberg, the Center's Chairman Emeritus; General Charles "Chuck" Boyd, the Center's new Chairman of the Board of Directors; and Senator Rand Paul.  Ambassador Richard Burt, a Member of the Center's Board of Directors, served as the Master of Ceremonies.

Please watch their remarks on our YouTube Channel here.

You can read Senator Paul's speech here.

You can read coverage of Senator Paul's speech at the Christian Science Monitor.

Ukraine, Armenia, and Russia

Four expert speakers at the Center for the National Interest agreed that Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych’s sudden decision to withdraw from negotiations on a European Union (EU) Association Agreement was a result of miscalculations in the EU and Ukraine as well as asymmetries between the EU and Russia.

Read the event summary here.

Energy Dialogue and U.S.-Russian Relations

American and Russian participants in a day-long discussion of the U.S. domestic energy revolution broadly agreed that soaring natural gas and oil production in the United States have produced considerable benefits for the country.  Nevertheless, they differed regarding the sustainability of growing U.S. production, the degree to which other countries are likely to enjoy similar success, and the implications for global markets, geopolitics, and Russia’s future.

Read the event summary here.

China's Air Defense Identification Zone

China's recent declaration of an Air Defense Identification Zone (ADIZ) in the East China Sea contributed to tensions between China, its neighbors, and the United States. The National Interest has covered the ADIZ and its strategic implications extensively.  Peter Mattis argues that the ADIZ "was a low-risk move capable of netting both policy successes and important informnation about U.S. intentions." Michal Mazza accuses the Obama Administration of showing insufficient resolve in the face of Beijing's decision. Using a baseball analogy, he explains "China has thrown a pitch at Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's head. But instead of ejecting the pitcher, the home plant umpire [the United States] jhas issued warnings to both dugouts." Jeffrey W. Hornung states the ADIZ is further evidence of China's "war on international norms" and that it "destabilizes an already volatile situation." Dean Cheng views the ASIZ as "an exercise in anti-access/area denial" that raises the real potential for confrontation and miscalculation."

China: Superpower or Bust?

“There is no question in my mind that the largest political risk…is what are the implications of the rise of China” and how successfully China’s government will be in handling the exigencies and changes brought about by this ascendancy, said Dr. Ian Bremmer, president and founder of Eurasia Group, at the Center for the National Interest. Nothing else is close, he insisted.  At this meeting, Bremmer discussed China's rise as well as his recent cover story in The National Interest, “China: Superpower or Superbust.” Jacob Heilbrunn, editor of The National Interest, moderated the event. 

Read the event summary here.

China's Economic Reforms: Priorities, Prospects & Impacts 

Many observers believe that China may be headed for a hard economic landing, with some even arguing that the world’s second-largest economy has already begun its slow-motion descent. However, there is likely still time to change course by implementing substantial economic reforms, which may be unveiled during China’s Third Plenum. On November 1, these and other issues were discussed by Robert Dohner, U.S. Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Treasury for Asia; Patrick Chovanec, Managing Director and Chief Strategist at Silvercrest Asset Management; and Nicholas Lardy, Anthony M. Solomon Senior Fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics. Joanna Yu Taylor, Director of CFTNI’s China and the Pacific Program, moderated the event. Senior Director of the Program, Lt. Gen. Chip Gregson, gave the opening remarks.

Read about it here.

What a Way to Run a Superpower

This month’s U.S. government shutdown may have looked bad for the Republican Party, but the party is far from dead and the issues that motivated the crisis are far from resolved, speakers said Thursday at an event hosted at the Center for the National Interest. At the event, Romina Boccia, a fellow at the Heritage Foundation, David Keene, opinion editor of The Washington Times, Robert Merry, political editor of The National Interest, and Dimitri K. Simes, president of the Center for the National Interest, discussed what the shutdown episode should teach us about the country’s domestic politics, the future of the GOP, and America’s global image and role. Jacob Heilbrunn, editor of The National Interest, moderated the event.

Read about it here.

Wither America's Asia Pivot? 

President Obama’s absence at the recent ASEAN summit meeting was not the disaster some have made it to be, said two experts at an event hosted by the Center for the National Interest this week.  Walter Lohman, Director of the Heritage Foundation’s Asian Studies Center, and Michael Auslin, Director of Japan Studies at the American Enterprise Institute engaged in a wide-ranging discussion about the Asia Rebalance.  The event was moderated by General Chip Gregson, the Senior Director of the Center’s China and the Pacific Program.

Read about it here.

 

Improved U.S.-Iran Relations?

According to one recent speaker at the Center for the National Interest, it remains to be seen whether the current diplomatic opening between Washington and Tehran will bear fruit, but two things are worth noting: At the end of the day, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani is a politician and a pragmatist. And the Iranian government is as bureaucratically inflexible as America’s. These issues, among others, were discussed and debated by Hadi Semati, a former professor at Tehran University and Rouhani’s Center for Strategic Research; Paul Saunders, Executive Director of the National Interest; and Cliff Kupchan, Director of the Eurasia, Middle East, and North Africa Program at Eurasia Group.  Dr. Geoffrey Kemp, the Director of the Center’s Regional Security Program, moderated the panel.

Read about it here.

 

China, Central Asia, and the United States

 

 

On Monday, September 23 with Pan Guang, Vice Chairman of the Shanghai Center for International Studies at the Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences and Director of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization Studies Center, spoke to an exclusive group at the Center for the National Interest.  Dr. Pan discussed the Shanghai Cooperation Organization and China’s relations with Central Asia. He was hosted by General Chip Gregson (ret.), the Senior Director of the China and the Pacific Program at the Center for the National Interest.

Read the summary of the event here:

Russian Ambassador to U.S. Speaks About Bilateral Ties

On September 6, Ambassador Sergey Kislyak spoke at the Center for the National Interest beside Center President Dimitri K. Simes.  He spoke candidly about a variety of issues central to increasingly contentious relations between the United States and Russia - most notably the ongoing civil war in Syria, Russia's support for the Assad regime, and the possibility of American military intervention.

Read Time Magazine's coverage of the event on its Swampland Blog here.

 

Extended Deterrence in a Changing Asia

On July 30, Center Executive Director Paul J. Saunders presented his new report, Extended Deterrence in a Changing Asia, and key conclusions from a two-year U.S.-Japan-South Korea expert dialogue on security issues in East Asia.  Jae Ku, Director of the U.S.-Korea Institute at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies, and Robert Manning, a Senior Fellow at the Atlantic Council of the United States and former State Department and National Intelligence Council official, also offered comments on East Asia’s security environment and the relationships among the United States, Japan, and South Korea.  Both were participants in the dialogue sessions, organized in Washington and Tokyo in cooperation with the Tokyo Foundation, a major Japanese policy institute.

A summary of the event is available here.

 

U.S. - Russia Dialogue

On July 26, 2013, the Center for the National Interest organized a U.S.-Russian dialogue meeting in cooperation with Russia’s Institute for Democracy and Cooperation to discuss timely issues in U.S.-Russia relations, including Edward Snowden’s fate and new questions surrounding President Barack Obama’s participation in the September G20 Summit in St. Petersburg as well as values differences and U.S.-Russia economic cooperation.  Center President Dimitri K. Simes and the Director of the Institute for Democracy and Cooperation, Andranik Migranyan, opened the session and moderated individual panels.  Speakers included Andrey Kortunov, President of the New Eurasia Foundation; Victoriya Panova, Associate Professor at the Moscow State Institute for International Relations; Matthew Rojansky, Director of the Kennan Institute at the Woodrow Wilson Center; Daniel Russell, President of the U.S.-Russia Business Council; Center Executive Director Paul Saunders.

 

A summary of the event is available here.

 

Arming the Syrian Opposition

On July 25, two experts on defense, strategy, and armaments, disagreed on the best way to assist the Syrian uprising and the extent to which the U.S. could hope to influence the outcome in Syria. Lincoln Bloomfield, Chairman of the Stimson Center, a former Assistant Secretary of State and Special Envoy tasked with reducing the threat of portable surface-to-air missiles; and Dov Zakheim, Vice Chairman of the Center for the National Interest and former Under Secretary for Defense, addressed the wide range of options for the U.S. in Syria. Dr. Geoffrey Kemp, Director of Regional Security Programs at the Center for the National Interest, served as moderator.

A summary of the event is available here.

 

 

U.S.-Japan-Vietnam Trilateral Cooperation

On July 15, the Center for the National Interest, the Research Institute for Peace and Security, and the Diplomatic Academy of Vietnam, inaugurated the first workshop for "Strengthening Strategic Partnerships: U.S.-Japan-Vietnam Trilateral Cooperation." Members of this Track II Trilateral Cooperation Dialogue discussed the regional strategic environment, each other's bilateral relationships, economic and trade development, and regional trade policy. Ambassador Rust Deming addressed the delegates as the keynote luncheon speaker. The inaugural workshop took place in Washington, D.C., and Members plan to convene also in Hanoi and Tokyo to examine other issues of mutual concern, including maritime security, nuclear energy and safety, and non-traditional security matters such as humanitarian assistance and disaster relief.

 

U.S. Policy Toward Russia

Speaking at the Center for the National Interest, two leading Russia experts, David Kramer and Paul Saunders, disagreed sharply over U.S. policy toward Russia.   Kramer, the President of Freedom House, urged the Obama administration to confront Moscow over democracy and human rights and suggested that this would have little cost to wider U.S. objectives because Russian cooperation was unlikely anyway.  Saunders, the Executive Director of the Center for the National Interest, argued that U.S. and Russian vital national interests are not in conflict and that a policy of engagement is more likely to bring results in both Russia’s foreign policy and its domestic evolution.  Ambassador Paula J. Dobriansky, former Under Secretary of State for Global Affairs during the George W. Bush Administration, moderated the discussion.

 

A summary of the event is available here.

Turkey's Troubles

On 25 June, at the Center for the National Interest, two top experts agreed that the ongoing protests in Turkey do not represent a nascent “Turkish Spring.”  The two experts, Henri Barkey, the Bernard L. and Bertha F. Cohen Professor at LeHigh University,  and Ross Wilson, who served as Ambassador to Turkey and is now the director of the Dinu Patriciu Eurasia Center at the Atlantic Council, spoke at length about “Turkey’s Troubles” with Dr. Geoffrey Kemp of the Center for the National Interest moderating.   The speakers focused on the internal and external implications of the Gezi Park/Taksim Square protest movement that erupted in late May

A summary of the event is available here.

Israel’s Fraying Image

On May 22, America's political ties to Israel were discussed during a luncheon discussion on Jacob Heilbrunn's recent cover article in the May/June issue of The National Interest. During the session, Heilbrunn's thesis was discussed by the author himself as well as by Peter Berkowitz, a senior fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution, and Chas Freeman, the American diplomat, author and commentator. TNI editor and leading presidential historian Robert W. Merry moderated.

A summary of the event is available here.

Immigration Reform: Costs and Consequences

On May 20, the Center brought together experts to assess the possible implications of the emerging immigration reform package. Mark Krikorian, Executive Director of the Center for Immigration Studies, and Steven Camarota, the CIS Director of Research, spoke. Center President Dimitri Simes -- who arrived in the United States as a political refugee forty years ago -- moderated.

A summary of the event is available here.

A Conversation with Suat Kiniklioglu

On April 26, the Center hosted an off-the-record dinner discussion with Suat Kiniklioglu, former chairman of the Turkish parliament's committee on foreign affairs and a leading member of the governing Justice and Development Party (AKP). Mr. Kiniklioglu spoke on Turkey's foreign and domestic policy, relations with the United States, and its approach to Syria and other regional powers in the Robert F. Ellsworth Study Group on U.S. Foreign Policy. Dov Zakheim, Vice Chairman of the Center, moderated the discussion.

War with Iran

On April 18, the Center held a discussion of the new book War With Iran: Political, Military and Economic Consequences by Geoffrey Kemp, Director for Regional Security Programs, and John Allen Gay, Assistant Editor for The National Interest magazine. The book provides a history of Iran's relationship with the West and expert assessments of the political, human and financial costs of a potential war with Iran. Panelists Michael Eisenstadt of the Washington Institute on Near East Policy and Suzanne Maloney of the Brookings Institution spoke and Dov Zakheim, Vice Chairman of the Center and a former Under Secretary of Defense, moderated.

A summary of the event is available here. The book can be purchased on Amazon.

Distinguished Service Award Dinner

On April 10, 2013, the Center for the National Interest honored Gen. Charles G. Boyd, USAF (Ret.) and House Armed Services Committee Chairman Howard P. "Buck" McKeon at its annual Distinguished Service Award Dinner in Washington. Center Chairman Maurice R. Greenberg introduced Gen. Boyd; Vice Chairman Dov S. Zakheim introduced Chairman McKeon. Other speakers included Center President Dimitri K. Simes, former Ambassador to Iraq, Afghanistan and the United Nations Zalmay Khalilzad, Susan Eisenhower, and PFC Energy Chairman J. Robinson West.

Video recordings of Gen. Boyd's and Chairman McKeon's speeches are available on the Center's YouTube page (Boyd and McKeon). The full texts are available on the Center's webpage (Boyd and McKeon) as well as remarks by Dimitri Simes, Maurice Greenberg, and Dov Zakheim.

Task Force on U.S. Policy Towards China

On April 2, 2013, the Center for the National Interest hosted the second meeting of its Task Force on U.S.-China Relations. Task Force co-chairs Maurice Greenberg, Chairman and CEO of C.V. Starr & Co. (second from left) and former National Security Advisor Brent Scowcroft (third from left) led the session. Also shown are Task Force members Admiral (Ret.) Michael Mullen, former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (left), and General (Ret.) Michael Hayden, former Director of the Central Intelligence Agency (right).

A Conversation with European Union Ambassador Vale de Almeida

On March 21, 2013, the Center for the National Interest hosted an off-the-record dinner discussion with H.E. Joao Vale de Almeida, Ambassador of the European Union to the United States. The ambassador assessed U.S.-EU trade talks, the EU's financial assistance to Cyprus, and other timely topics for participants in the Robert F. Ellsworth Study Group on U.S. Foreign Policy. Jacob Heilbrunn, the Center's Senior Fellow for U.S. Foreign Policy, moderated the meeting.

War with Iran: Political, Military and Economic Consequences

The Center for the National Interest is pleased to announce the publication of War With Iran: Political, Military and Economic Consequences by Geoffrey Kemp, Director for Regional Security Programs, and John Allen Gay, Assistant Editor for The National Interest magazine. The book provides a history of Iran's relationship with the West and expert assessments of the political, human and financial costs of a potential war with Iran.

The book is available on Amazon.

Interview with Kishore Mahbubani

On March 8, Robert W. Merry, editor of The National Interest, conducted an exclusive interview with Kishore Mahbubani, former Singaporean Ambassador to the United Nations, Dean of the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy at the National University of Singapore, and author of the new book, The Great Convergence: Asia, the West, and the Logic of One World. The interview is available on the Center's YouTube page and will soon be available online at http://nationalinterest.org/.

Afterward, Mahbubani, considered an iconoclast by many but also a very important and provocative thinker in Southeast Asia, sat down with some of the Center for the National Interest’s staff to discuss why now is the time for the United States to craft the international community’s “rules of the road” while we are still “Number One.” A summary of his remarks is available here.

Legislative Irrelevance

On March 7, former U.S. Senator Jim Webb gave remarks on his article in The National Interest about the role of Congress in today’s foreign policymaking environment during a lunch discussion moderated by Robert Merry, Editor of The National Interest. Drawing upon his six years in the Senate, along with his experiences as a House committee counsel and as assistant secretary of defense and secretary of the navy, Webb's article paints a vivid portrait of a Congress that is abdicating its role in U.S. foreign policy and war making as the executive branch becomes increasingly assertive on those matters.

A summary will soon be available in this space.

U.S.-Russia Dialogue in Washington

On February 26-28, the Center for the National Interest organized a U.S.-Russia dialogue program to discuss American and Russian differences over Russia's governance and the impact of those disagreements on relations between Washington and Moscow. During the first panel, Vladimir Pligin, Chairman of the State Duma's Committee on Law and the Constitution, and former National Security Advisor Zbigniew Brzezinski presented alternative perspectives on Russia's evolving political system. Former Under Secretary of State for Democracy and Global Affairs Paula Dobriansky moderated. Other Russian speakers included Konstantin Remchukov, editor-in-chief of the opposition-leaning newspaper Nezavisimaya Gazeta; Igor Yurgens, head of the Institute for Contemporary Development, a liberal think tank; and Andranik Migranyan, director of the Institute for Democracy and Cooperation, an informal Kremlin advisor. The Russian group also met with senior U.S. officials and key members of Congress.

The AIG Story

 

On February 21, the Center for the National Interest hosted a reception for the book launch of "The AIG Story" co-authored by Maurice R. Greenberg and George Washington University law professor Lawrence Cunningham. Mr. Greenberg is Chairman and CEO of C.V. Starr & Co. and Chairman of the Center for the National Interest’s Board of Directors. As AIG’s long-time Chairman and CEO, he transformed the company into a global insurance and financial institution. At the session, he discussed AIG's remarkable rise to become a company with nearly $1 trillion in assets as well as its near-destruction by regulators and government officials.

The event was streamed live on C-SPAN and will be available for viewing shortly on BookTV.

Going to Tehran

On February 21, Flynt and Hillary Mann Leverett, authors of "Going to Tehran," spoke at the Center for the National Interest. In their remarks, the Leveretts suggested that the United States is in relative decline in the Middle East and that Iran is the principal beneficiary of Washington's loss of power. To arrest this decline, they argued, the United States must attempt to re-engage with Tehran and to overcome many of the myths about the Islamic Republic that have proliferated in recent years. Ambassador Richard Burt, member of the Center's Board of Directors, moderated.

A summary is available here.

Abe's Japan: Opportunities and Challenges

On February 21, the Center for the National Interest hosted a small delegation of next-generation Japanese scholars and professionals featuring Mr. Hiroaki Kuwajima, a specialist in Japanese economics and business, who discussed his ideas on "Abenomics" and Dr. Shingo Yoshida, a specialist in the U.S.-Japan alliance, who discussed the Alliance's recent "institutionalization." Their visit to Washington DC was part of an inaugural Japan-U.S. exchange project funded by the Sasakawa Peace Foundation. The delegation also discussed the upcoming meeting between Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and President Obama, the continuing dispute over the Senkaku/Diaoyu islands in the East China Sea, as well as the future of the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement.

American Defense Policy

On February 20, the Center for the National Interest hosted former Under Secretary for Defense for Policy Michèle Flournoy for a dinner conversation as part of the Robert F. Ellsworth Study Group on U.S. Foreign Policy. Flournoy gave remarks on issues related to defense expenditure, force posture and long-term strategic challenges. Dov Zakheim, Vice Chair of the Center, chaired the event.

The Changing Global Energy Landscape

 

On February 8, former US Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham spoke at a lunch event at the Center for the National Interest on the implications of developing energy trends for the United States. Secretary Abraham gave remarks on the development of non-traditional energy sectors, on the geopolitical context of America's future energy challenges and opportunities, and on the role of government in the national resource market.

A summary is available here. Video excerpts from the event are available here.

The Israeli Elections and Iran

On January 28, the Center hosted the Director of the Crown Center for Middle East Studies at Brandeis University, Shai Feldman, for a lunch discussion of the impact of the recent Israeli elections on the country's Iran policy. Dr. Feldman spoke and led discussion on the events of the elections and the future of political discourse in Israel's domestic political arena. He gave remarks on the future of the US-Israeli relationship, on Prime Minister Netanyahu's mandate for tackling the Iran problem during this term in office and on the domestic challenges to be faced by the new government. Geoffrey Kemp, Director of Regional Security Programs at the Center, moderated.

A summary is available here.

The United Kingdom and the European Union

On January 9, noted conservative British journalist and author Geoffrey Wheatcroft spoke at the Center for the National Interest on the role of the United Kingdom in European and Transatlantic affairs. He gave remarks on Britain’s culture of Euro-skepticism, the future shape of the country’s domestic politics and relationships with Germany and the United States. Dov Zakheim, Vice Chariman of the Center and a former Under Secretary of Defense, moderated.

A summary is available here. Commentary on the event by the Senior Editor of the National Interest, Jacob Heilbrunn, is available here.

 

[ More At The Center ]
 
In this edition of The National Interest

July-August 2014

COVER STORY

A Dangerous Realignment

ARTICLE

Ukraine's Ancient Hatreds

BOOKS & REVIEWS

The Mysterious World of Stefan Zweig

Complete Table of Contents

You can subscribe to TNI for just $29.95 per year. Click here to sign up for TNI’s daily email digest.

 
RECENT PUBLICATIONS

In a paper published as part of the John Hopkins University Smarter Power Working Paper Series, Paula J. Dobriansky, Senior Fellow at Harvard University's JFK Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, and Paul J. Saunders, Executive Director of the Center for the National Interest, discuss whether and how the United States can use its new energy resources as a source of foreign policy leverage.

Russia's military bid in Iraq
Paul J. Saunders, in an article for Al Monitor, reports on the implications of the recent decision by Moscow to deliver fighter jets to Iraq to help in attacking the militants.

How Obama Is Driving Russia and China Together
Dimitri K. Simes explores the possibility that foreign policy decisions by Obama and the United States may have caused Putin to see the U.S. as weak, compelling him to foster realignment.

Chechen extremists threaten Jordan
In Al Monitor, Paul J. Saunders discusses the potential sign of a threat to Jordan after King Abdullah's visit to the Chechen Republic.

The Interventionists Who Cried Wolf
In an article for The National Interest, Paul J. Saunders, discusses skepticism surrounding the actions of American Interventionists in overseas adventures.  

Russia, Qatar compete in natural gas market 
In Al Monitor, Paul J. Saunders reports on considerations by Russia and Qatar to increase their cooperation in the natural gas industry in the Gas Exporting Countries Forum - despite their deep disagreements over Syria.

Ukraine, Russia, and U.S. Foreign Policy 
Dimitri K. Simes speaks to Jacob Heilbrunn, editor of The National Interest, about Ukraine's election and Obama's major foreign policy address at the commencement ceremony for West Point.  

A New Obama Doctrine at West Point?
Paul J. Saunders, in an article for The Tokyo Foundation, points out that in the president's commencement speech, he raises more questions that answers about his foreign policy goals and strategy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
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